Monthly Archives: June 2015

Unit 4: Algorithms Curriculum Resources

Rebecca’s Blog Posts:

Videos:

Tutorials & Presentations:

External Links:

I have spent the last 18 years teaching math and computer science at Powhatan High School in Powhatan Virginia. I currently teach Algebra 2, Exploring Computer Science/Game Design, and AP Computer Science. I also facilitate a Middle School Tech Club, Game Design and Tech Divas Summer Camps.

Unit 5: Data Curriculum Resources

Rebecca’s Blog Posts:

Videos:

Tutorials & Presentations:

Activities:

 

I have spent the last 18 years teaching math and computer science at Powhatan High School in Powhatan Virginia. I currently teach Algebra 2, Exploring Computer Science/Game Design, and AP Computer Science. I also facilitate a Middle School Tech Club, Game Design and Tech Divas Summer Camps.

Unit 1: Computers in Society Curriculum Resources

Rebecca’s Blog Posts:

Videos:

Tutorials & Presentations:

Activities:

External Links:

I have spent the last 18 years teaching math and computer science at Powhatan High School in Powhatan Virginia. I currently teach Algebra 2, Exploring Computer Science/Game Design, and AP Computer Science. I also facilitate a Middle School Tech Club, Game Design and Tech Divas Summer Camps.

Unit 2: Internet Unplugged Curriculum Resources

Rebecca’s Blog Posts:

Videos

Tutorials & Presentations

External Links

I have spent the last 18 years teaching math and computer science at Powhatan High School in Powhatan Virginia. I currently teach Algebra 2, Exploring Computer Science/Game Design, and AP Computer Science. I also facilitate a Middle School Tech Club, Game Design and Tech Divas Summer Camps.

AP Computer Science

AP Computer Science A is equivalent to a first-semester, college-level course in computer science. The course introduces students to computer science with fundamental topics that include problem solving, design strategies and methodologies, organization of data (data structures), approaches to processing data (algorithms), analysis of potential solutions, and the ethical and social implications of computing. The course emphasizes both object-oriented and imperative problem solving and design using Java language. (AP Computer Science A Course Overview).

Our Curriculum Resources:

 

College Board Resources:

External Links:

I have spent the last 18 years teaching math and computer science at Powhatan High School in Powhatan Virginia. I currently teach Algebra 2, Exploring Computer Science/Game Design, and AP Computer Science. I also facilitate a Middle School Tech Club, Game Design and Tech Divas Summer Camps.

Rebecca’s Plan – Unit 2: Internet Unplugged

Day 1:

  • Using the Lino.it website: Write your definition of the Internet, and share at least three questions you have about it.
  • CodeAcademy
  • Exit Ticket: Mapping the Internet

Day 2:

  • Fast Start: Make a website that shows your name in size 7 Tahoma font. Change the background and font color.
  • Code Academy – 20 minutes
  • Discussion Board – try HTML in the discussion board
  • Questions: Write your answers to the following:
    • What is the difference between the HEADER and the BODY?
    • What does the size command do for fonts? for the HR tag?

Day 3:

Day 4:

  • Fast Start: Answer the following:
    1. What is Morse code?
    2. What problem did it solve?
    3. What are some limitations?
    4. How do you think Morse code relates to studying the Internet?
  • Share these with your elbow partner and be prepared to share your answers with the group.
  • Watch Morse Code Videos:
  • Finish Cups and Strings – class discussion & do handout
  • CodeAcademy – 20 minutes
  • Create a webpage – add a picture to the page.
  • Exit ticket: Why do you think the HTML file and picture must be in the same file directory?

Day 5

  • Fast Start: Create three webpages. Each page should have at least one image and a different background color. Link between the pages as shown in the picture.

HTML Page Links

  • Quiz – Basic HTML Tags
  • Check out the Evolution of the web:  http://www.evolutionoftheweb.com/
    • Pick one innovation shown on this site and describe the area of our lives (social, economic, or cultural) that has been most impacted by the innovation, and discuss the significance of the innovation to this area.
  • Start CSS – tutorial: http://www.w3schools.com/css/
  • Exit Ticket: What is CSS?

Day 6

Day 7

  • Fast Start
    1. In the cup & string activity why was it necessary to decide how the dots and dashes of Morse code would be transmitted ?
    2. What is a router?
    3. In binary what is the largest base-ten number you can store using 8 bits?
  •  Notes:
    • Lesson 4: IP Addressing
    • Video – How the Internet Works (good specifics on DNS, IP addresses, etc)
    • Networking Activity

Day 8

  • Question Day – I picked one question from the beginning of the unit, assigned group, and gave them one day to come up with an answer based on everything we have learned. (more info on those questions here)

Day 9

Day 10

Day 11 – 15

  • Performance Task
I have spent the last 18 years teaching math and computer science at Powhatan High School in Powhatan Virginia. I currently teach Algebra 2, Exploring Computer Science/Game Design, and AP Computer Science. I also facilitate a Middle School Tech Club, Game Design and Tech Divas Summer Camps.

Rebecca’s Plan – Topic 1: Computers in Society

Day 1

  • Fast Start (borrowed from Exploring Computer Science Journal Entry) –>  How many computers are in the room?
  • With person next to you – share answers.
  • How did you count the computers?
  • Whole class –> put ideas about what counts as a computer on post it notes –> can we collect into categories?
  • What pieces of hardware do computers have in common? Why is a __ not a computer?
  • What pieces of hardware do computers have in common? Collect Answers on http://en.linoit.com
  • As a group – move the pieces of hardware into piles. Play the game -it is a computer
  • Using the definition of a computing device we developed as a class try it on different objects: cell phone, pencil sharpener (has input and output…)
  • Review course syllabus and class procedures
  • Exit Ticket: What questions do you have about this class? (none is not an answer!)

Day 2

  • Fast Start – Class Procedures
  • Journal entry: Based on the partner brainstorm you did last class, how would you define a computing device?
  • Worksheet: Computing Systems
  • Exit Ticket: When I hear Dual Core Processor I am curious about…

Day 3

  • Fast Start: List the five major components of a computer system:
  • Discussion Board – Topic 1 – netiquette
  • Interactive Computer Project: You will build a digital model of the parts of a computer. Make sure to include all the parts listed on the Hardware Presentation worksheet you did earlier today.
    • You must illustrate, label, and explain the function of all of the parts of the computer system we have discussed.
    • Can use Alice, PowerPoint, Visual Basic, etc to create your project.

Day 4

  • Fast Start – computer Architecture
  • Finish Interactive Computer Project – 40 minutes
  • Activity – Fetch Execute Cycle: (pdf are at the bottom of the page)

Day 5

  • Fast start – review computer hardware
  • Activity – Act ot the CPU
  • Notes – Von Neumann Architecture
  • Discussion board:
    • The premise that our society is different from what it would have been without the computer revolution is generally accepted. Is our society better than it would have been without the revolution? Is our society worse?
    • Consider the following questions in your answer:
      • Would your answer differ if your position within society were different?
      • How is your life different than your parent’s generation? Your grandparents?
      • Make sure to include concrete examples to back up your opinions.
    • You must have at least three posts, so don’t forget to respond to other people’s posts.

Day 6

  • Fast Start: With your elbow partner – write a program for the CPU to add 3 numbers using the commands:  Load    Read    Add
  • Swap program with another group – follow their directions. Did it work?
  • Group discussion on algorithms – how are people different than machines in following directions?
  • Partner Again – Define algorithm – how does this relate to what we just did?
  • Quiz on Computer Hardware
  • Video: Ted Talk on Simplicity
  • Exit Ticket: Exit Ticket – Why do you think we use Base Ten numbers? IE we use the digits 0 -9 to describe numbers, why does western civilization use that base? (as opposed to base 13, or 20…)

(* You might notice a thread over the next few days – we are starting to do some thinking questions and puzzles to inch them towards binary – rather than a 45 minute lecture on binary I am building a set of experiences so they come in already knowing some things – like there is only one representation for every number in binary. I’m sneaky like that *)

Day 7

  • Fast Start: Copy the Notes on the Machine Instruction Cycle
  • Reading Blown to Bits  Chapter 1
  • Partner Activity:
    • Using one light switch how would you represent the number 0? 1?
    • If you only had an light switch to represent numbers how would you represent 0, 1? What if you had two light switches – how many numbers could you represent? How would you represent them?
  • Discuss as a group – how many combinations would you have with 4? What is the patterns (getting at 2^0, 2^1, 2^2, 2^3 , 2^4 etc)

Day 8

  • Fast Start – with a partner Grab a set of cards (with the smiley faces). Using these – how many ways can you make the number: 13? 15? 3?
  • Make binary Flippy-Do’s (Analog Binary Calculators) Here’s how:Binary Flip Picture
  • How to translate to and from base ten and binary
  • Practice problems: give them several base ten / binary numbers to translate
  • Exit Ticket Journal – What does analog mean? What parts of your analog world cannot be captured using digital – why? How does digital representation limit our knowledge of the world around us?

Day 9

  • Fast Start: Review binary basics
  • Building an understanding of binary addition
  • With your elbow Partner:
    • 1) What do you expect 001 + 001 to equal?
    • 2)  What do you expect 011 +001 to equal? How did you get this answer?
    • 3) Write out an algorithm for adding binary numbers?
    • When done swap with another group to check your steps.
  • Whole group – cover the rules/algorithm of binary addition
  • Reading/Listen – MP3 Compression – What are we losing?
  • Exit Ticket: Journal Topic: What other things that you regularly use do you think are impacted by digital compression? How does this impact your experience with them? Does it matter that information is lost when translating analog to digital?

Day 10

Day 11

Day 12

  • Work on Computer History Project – 30 min
  • With your elbow partner – how would you expect octal (base 8) to work? What digits does it use?
    • What would you expect 17 to be in octal? 23?
    • Convert from Hex to Base ten: ABF 2F3 103
  • Read: Blown to Bits  Chapter 2 -> type up 20 questions about the chapter 2 reading for your classmates to answer

Day 13

Day 14

  • Test Review
  • Reading from the Code Book on  Mechanising of Secrecy
    • His site has some great resources – I use this as a lead in to encryption over the Internet. Basically setting the stage that humans have long had the need to send information privately
  • Test Review Activity:
    • For the Computer Science Principles classes last week I had them define Computer Science . The Wordle below is from their definitions after Unit 1. I am planning on having them do this each unit and see how our collective definition shifts as we layer on more material. I think this might make a good writing prompt later in the year. (see below)
    • In groups – put a collective definition of Computer Science in the center of a blank sheet of paper. Around this put all 7 big ideas, and list the things we did this unit that related to the big ideas.
    • Example: Abstraction – binary numbers
    • We used this as the basis of an essay question on the test.

Day 15

 

I have spent the last 18 years teaching math and computer science at Powhatan High School in Powhatan Virginia. I currently teach Algebra 2, Exploring Computer Science/Game Design, and AP Computer Science. I also facilitate a Middle School Tech Club, Game Design and Tech Divas Summer Camps.

Richmond City Public School – Summer Coding Program for Middle Schoolers

This five week program introduces students to computer science and coding.  Each of the 19 hour and a half sessions lets kids explore coding and how computer science impacts their world.

 

Day 1 – Camp Introduction

Warm Up – Introductions

Activity

Wrap Up

  • Group Discussion – why is it important to be specific when telling computers what to do?

Day 2 – Introduction to Coding

Warm Up – Maze

  • Print a maze for each student and give them 5 – 10 minutes to complete it
  • http://krazydad.com/mazes/sfiles/KD_AnimalMazes_v12.pdf
  • Discuss with the group – if you had to tell someone how to walk through a maze what kind of commands would you use? Write responses on the board

Activity: Maze and Bee – learning basic commands

Wrap Up

  • Group Discussion: How could the commands used in solving mazes be used in real life?

 

Day 3 – Artist Loops

Warm Up – Review the commands from the maze activities

  • With your elbow partner brainstorm some problems you could solve with those commands

Activity:

Wrap Up

 

Day 4 – Artist Variables

Warm Up

Activity:

Wrap Up

  • Have students continue working on puzzles

Day 5 – Artist Variables Cont.

Warm Up

  • Group discussion – what are variables?

Activity:

Wrap Up

 

 

Day 6 – Play Lab Variables

Warm Up – Light Bot

Activity:

Wrap Up

  • Do a gallery walk and let students try each other’s games

 

Day 7 – Bee: For Loops

Warm Up

  • Group Discussion – how are variables used in games?

Activity:

 

Wrap Up

  • Continue working on the puzzles

 

Day 8 – Play Lab: For Loops

Warm Up

Activity:

Wrap Up

  • Continue working on the puzzles

 

 

Day 9 – Artist For-Loops

Warm Up

Activity:

 

Wrap Up

 

Day 10 – Play Lab: For Loops

Warm Up

  • Group Discussion – Why do people use computers to repeat things? What examples of repeating can you think of?

Activity:

 

Wrap Up

  • Using Level 8 have students create their own program. Let them swap computers with their elbow partners and try out each other’s creations.

 

Day 11 – Artist: Functions

Warm Up

Activity:

 

Wrap Up

  • Finish the Lightbot Levels

 

Day 12 – Artist: Functions with Parameters

Warm Up

  • Group Discussion –  How did functions help you get through the Lightbot levels?

Activity:

 

Wrap Up

  • Group discussion – what are parameters?

 

 

Day 13 & 14 – Made with Code – Art

Activity:

  • For the next two days students will work with the Google Made with Code online tools: https://www.madewithcode.com/project/art
  • If they finish early try out some of the other Made with Code tools – they include fashion and music

 

Wrap Up – End of Day 2

  • Gallery Walk – show off what you made!

Day 15 – 19 – Made with Code – Sound

Warm Up

Activity:

 

Wrap Up – End of Day 19

  • Gallery Walk – show off what you made!
Rebecca Dovi
As CEO (chief educational officer) of CodeVA Rebecca is responsible for training teachers and developing computer science curriculum as CodeVA works to bring computer science education to all Virginia students.